Praying Mantis Death and Gore!

January 10, 2017

Over the last few weeks I have been bombarded with praying mantis sightings, stories, and text messages. It is the season for LARGE mantids, and I wanted to share a few with you.

This preying mantis is trying out the Fall color pallete. Photo by Brian Brown.

 

Found in our Nature Gardens on a 'Cynthia Giddy' aloe flower, this female mantis looks as though she is about to drop an egg case at any moment. Finding a mantis egg case, also known as an ootheca, in your backyard is a good sign. Mantids are great predators and help to keep pest insects in check.  

Female mantis caught in the act of laying her egg case. 

Across the city in Koreatown, this mantis was actually caught in the act of laying her ootheca! Over time the mass will harden and the upto 100 eggs will develop. In the spring the eggs will hatch and 100s of teeny tiny mantids will emerge. They better move fast though. If no other food is present, baby mantids often make a meal of their weaker brothers or sisters!

Dead mantis found in Museum's Nature Gardens. Photo by Molly Porter.

 

Just in time for Halloween, this last mantis is actually DEAD. It is also one of the few gray colored mantids (tan/brown or green mantids are more commonly seen). Although it is doing a good impression of a ghost, this mantis if real, unfortunately real dead. We can only hope that it was able to mate and pass on its genetic material before its demise. 

 

(Posted by: Lila Higgins)


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Oothe-whata?

December 1, 2015

"What is that?” That was the question I asked my supervisor, Lila Higgins, back in the fall of 2012 when she brought in a strange looking object attached to a stick. “This is an ootheca, an egg case” she replied.

Ootheca seen on a Lion's Tail plant (Leonotis leonurus) Nov 3, 2015 in the Nature Gardens at NHMLA. Photo credit: Richard Smart The ootheca was attached to a stick that Lila had brought inside to our office. Lila saw the stick lying on the ground in our Nature Gardens. Originally, she was going to place the stick into a nearby garden bed, but as she looked closer she noticed the ootheca. She recognized the shape of the ootheca to be that of a mantid egg case. Lila decided she would help the mantid babies by bringing them indoors, so they could develop without interference from predators or people. I was very curious on how long it would take for the mantids to hatch out, and I wondered just how many and how large the young mantids would be when they emerged. Days of checking the ootheca, turned into weeks, which turned into months. Then finally, in March of 2013, I heard Lila happily exclaim, “The ootheca hatched!” I ran over and was fascinated to see miniature mantids on her desk. They looked like the much larger mantids I was used to seeing, but teeny tiny. They were unbelievably cute. Lila even wrote her own blog post about it.

Baby mantid seen March 29, 2013. Photo credit: Lila Higgins That experience made quite an impression on me, and it came to mind recently when I saw an ootheca attached to a Lion’s Tail plant in the Nature Gardens at NHMLA. My colleague, Richard Hayden, also recently posted an ootheca to Instagram, and that got me thinking that others were likely seeing these in L.A. and perhaps they didn’t know what they were.

Backside of an ootheca seen on a Catalina Perfume plant (Ribes viburnifolium) November 18, 2015 in the Nature Gardens at NHMLA. Photo credit: Richard Hayden An ootheca can blend in very well with the plant they are attached to, so many people may not see them. Or people may think they are a sign of a sick or injured plant, and may remove the branches they are attached to, not realizing they were removing baby mantids from their gardens. Mantids are considered to be a beneficial insect since they will eat many garden pests such as grasshoppers, caterpillars, and aphids – you want mantids in your yard. The egg case actually starts as a frothy mass, but hardens to form a tough capsule that protects the growing young inside. Depending upon the mantid species, there can be anywhere from dozens to hundreds of mantids inside the ootheca, so by picking up sticks with an ootheca attached to them can help out a lot of mantids. 

Ootheca on wire fence, Nov 23, 2013 in the Nature Gardens at NHMLA. Photo credit: Lila Higgins Are you seeing oothecae in your part of L.A.? If so, I encourage you to let them be. The egg case will protect them from rain and temperature changes. If you see an ootheca attached to a broken stick laying on the ground then kindly place the stick in an area where they are less likely to be damaged by people. You can also take photo of the egg cases, and tag us using #NatureinLA so we can add your #ootheca photos to our L.A. Nature Map!  

 

(Posted by: Richard Smart)


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Twelve Days of Los Angeles Nature: 2013

December 23, 2013

Let's celebrate another year of L.A.'s AMAZING BIODIVERSITY. The benevolent blogger that I am, here are your gifts: Twelve Rattlers Rattling

Eleven Potter Wasps Piping

Ten Flies Decapitating (decapitating ants that is)

Nine Dragons Dancing (in the L.A. River)

Eight Mantids a Milking

Seven Planarians a Swimming

Six Lizards a Laying

Five Foxes Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding!

Four Glowing Worms (yes, they're glowworm beetles)

Three French Opossums

Two Turtle Newts

and P-22 in the Hollywood Hills

Here's to another year full of amazing Los Angeles nature discoveries! *P-22 image courtesy of the Griffith Park Connectivity Study  

(Posted by: Lila Higgins)

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The Loudest Frogs Around

September 21, 2017

Baby Mantis Explosion

March 29, 2013

Lately, I've been so busy working on our new Nature Lab exhibit (OPENING THIS JUNE PEOPLE) that I rarely make it into my office anymore. Earlier this week, I popped in to check some e-mails (fun I know) and what do you think I found?An explosion of praying mantids!They were on my #2 pencils:

#cute They were on my scissors:

#thisisnotanadvertisement They hatched out of this ootheca (nerdy word for egg case):

If you ever find yourself in a similar situation, do not fret! All you need to do, is collect them in a jar and release them into the closest garden!Live long and prosper my tiny predatory friends, eat lots of pests and keep laying those oothecas!

(Posted by: Lila Higgins)


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The Loudest Frogs Around

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Praying Mantis

November 4, 2011

Earlier this week I saw my first praying mantis in the North Campus! I was walking back from lunch at USC and there she was right in front of me on the path.

Female Mediterranean Mantid, Iris oratoria, running for coverI knew she was a female because of her enlarged abdomen, males have much narrower abdomens and also longer wings. As I got really close to her to capture this picture, she went into her defensive posture. She reared up on her hind legs, extended her raptorial (modified for capturing prey) front legs, and flashed her brightly patterned black and yellow hind wings. She stayed in this posture for about 15 seconds and then ran for cover in the plantings. Hopefully she'll lay an egg case and we'll have baby mantids in the spring!

Mediterranean Mantid defensive posture (image courtesy of What's That Bug website)

(Posted by: Lila Higgins)


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