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June 9, 2017

 



 

Pop- Up Dinner with Chef David Wilcox 7:30pm

 

Whet your appetite for a culinary adventure. The First Fridays Pop-up dinner on June 9 features Chef David Wilcox of Journeymen LA preparing a feast for all the senses. Enjoy this six-course, family-style meal al fresco in the Museum’s enchanting Edible Garden. With the finest local ingredients prepared with classic techniques, the menu features fresh vegetables, seafood, and pasture-raised pork, paired with wine, beer, and an assortment of non-alcoholic beverages. And be sure to leave room for a decadent dessert at the end of this unique dining experience.

 

Menu*

 

*menu subject to change based on availability

 

Arrival Bites

  • grilled broccoli . romesco . hazelnuts
  • smoked black cod . toast . crème fraîche
  • radish . cultured butter . preserved lemon

 

Family Style

  • charred little gems . smoked carrots . snap peas . mustard vinaigrette
  • summer squash . nettles pistou . pistachio . parmesan
  • California king salmon . avocado . turnips . salsa verde

 

Main - served by the chef

  • smoked garlic porchetta . swiss chard . apricot relish . sesame

 

Dessert

  • chocolate pound cake . vanilla bean cream . summer berries


 

Purchase Tickets Here: $90 for members and $100 for non- member
(Purchase of Pop-Up Dinner ticket includes general admission to First Fridays event.)

 

 

Conversations

 

"Food for Thought” with the Anthropology and History Departments

Tours: 5 pm, 5:30 pm, 6 pm

The food on our plate evolves as technology advances, alternative diets are sought, and the climate changes. Join us on a special tour and discover the connections between food and natural history.
 

 

Discussion

 

“L.A. History on Your Plate” with Jonathan Gold, Bricia Lopez and Josh Kun

Discussion: 6:30 pm

Once upon a time, Angelenos grew what they ate. But WWII Japanese internments whisked accomplished growers off the land, and by the 1950s, aside from some fancy New York-style eateries, food culture was bleak. New immigrants brought delicious unknowns in the ’60s, and casual chic cuisine emerged in the ’70s. The cheeseburger, fortune cookie, French dip, Chinese chicken salad – all L.A. creations.  Find out how the most diverse city in the nation became its foodie capital.

 

 

Speakers

 

 

Jonathan Gold

Jonathan Gold is the restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times. He won the Pulitzer Prize in criticism in 2007 and was a finalist again in 2011. A Los Angeles native, he began writing the Counter Intelligence column for the L.A. Weekly in 1986, wrote about death metal and gangsta rap for Rolling Stone and Spin among other places, and is delighted that he has managed to forge a career out of the professional eating of tacos.

 

Bricia Lopez

Having been born and raised in Mitla, Oaxaca, rich in culinary tradition and indigenous food culture, Bricia comes from a long lineage of Oaxacan Mezcal craftsman. She grew up in her grandmother’s kitchen where alongside her mother and sisters, lived the traditions of mole and true artisanal cooking. Her father founded Guelaguetza in 1994, a Oaxacan restaurant that has become a temple to Oaxacan food and tradition in Los Angeles and the US. She began working alongside her family in the restaurant business at a very young age. Bricia is a graduate of Mount Saint Mary’s College, majoring in Business Administration. She is currently a partner at Guelaguetza and today, spearheads all operations alongside her three siblings. Bricia has become a staunch proponent of Oaxacan culture and an integral figure in the gastronomic culture of Los Angeles. Referred to as a “Oaxacan Princess” by Jonathan Gold, Bricia has been quoted on her expertise by several publications, including Conde Nast Traveler and The New Yorker.

 

Josh Kun

Josh Kun is Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication and the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. He is an author and editor of several books, including Songs in the Key of Los Angeles, To Live and Dine in L.A., and forthcoming later this year, The Tide Was Always High: The Music of Latin America in Los Angeles (UC Press) and Double Vision: The Photography of George Rodriguez (Hat & Beard). As a curator and artist, he has worked with SFMOMA, The Getty Foundation, The Grammy Museum, ASU Art Museum, and others. He is a 2016 MacArthur Fellow.
 

 

Moderator: Patt Morrison

Patt Morrison is a Los Angeles writer and newspaper columnist who has a share of two Pulitzer Prizes. She has won six Emmys and eleven Golden Mike awards for her work hosting public television and radio programs. She also hosted the nationally syndicated television program “The Book Show with Patt Morrison,” and her seminal nonfiction book “Rio LA, Tales from the Los Angeles River” was a best-seller. Her writing appears in both fiction and nonfiction anthologies. And Pink’s, the legendary Hollywood hot dog stand, named its vegetarian hot dog “The Patt Morrison Baja Veggie Dog” in her honor.

DJ Lounge

DJ Lounge: 5 - 11 pm

 

 

VOOMZ


5 - 8 pm

Marcelle Harlow, also known as simply VOOMZ, is a Los Angeles based DJ/artist/composer sought after for her in-depth musical knowledge and colorful, energetic mixes unrestricted by genre or era. Starting off with just her guitar in tow, the singer/songwriter soon evolved into a DJ/producer now also composing for Films & Television. VOOMZ is currently working on several art & business projects weaving poetry, art, music, and technology into multisensory experiences, as well as finishing up a fun music & film collaboration with DJ Lola Langusta. Sign up at voomz.net for updates on new music, exhibitions, and other exciting releases.

 

 

Vinyl Selections by DJs Victoria Rawlins and Nina Tarr


8 - 11 pm

With crates of records in tow to lounges and dancefloors near and far, Victoria Rawlins and Nina Tarr have each established themselves as mainstays within the soundscape of Los Angeles nightlife.  Always dedicated to spinning vinyl, their carefully curated selections are sourced from all genres and all decades as they seamlessly bridge the gap between deep floorfillers and singalong anthems.  Together, Victoria and Nina have been running their flagship collaboration for nearly four years — a weekly dance party called All Girls All Vinyl which gets down Thursday nights at Houston Hospitality’s Hollywood hotspot No Vacancy.
 

Performances

8 pm - 10 pm

 

Nick Hakim


7:30 pm

For singer-songwriter Nick Hakim, it all started in a house in Jamaica Plains, MA with collaborators Naima and Solo Woods. There, he put the finishing touches on his breakthrough EPs, Where Will We Go, Pt. I & II, which would later release through his Earseed Records and earn critical praise from NPR and The New York Times. But it was where the sessions for the two-part project ended and the ideas began to materialize for what would become his full-length debut, Green Twins (releasing via ATO Records in 2017), an experimental step forward with emotional heft gleaned from his experiences in the years since.
The story of Green Twins truly began when, armed with the masters for his EPs, Hakim moved from Boston to Brooklyn, spending his time fleshing out unfinished ideas in his bedroom. He came up with lyrics on the spot while playing the live circuit at solo shows including Palisades and NYXO, recording sketches and lyrics on voice memos and a four-track cassette recorder, and embracing the local community of musicians by performing with bands like Jesse and Forever and Onyx Collective. From there, Green Twins came about as a sum of its parts: Hakim took the demo recordings to studios in New York City, Philadelphia and London, and built on them with engineers including Andrew Sarlo (bass, engineering, production), keeping the original essence of the songs intact. Sarlo notes that “for other artists, a demo serves as a potential shape the song could form into. But for Nick, demos are more like creating a temple: a sanctuary that now we have to go into and somehow clean, furnish, and get ready for other people to experience the sermon in.”
“I put a lot of thought to the things I’d say, but a lot of it is what I was thinking in the moment, very specific songs,” he says of Green Twins, “many of them are like self-portraits”. The record draws from influences spanning Robert Wyatt, Marvin Gaye and Shuggie Otis to Portishead and My Bloody Valentine. “I also felt the need to push my creativity in a different way than I had on the EPs”, he continues. “We wanted to imagine what it would have sounded like if RZA had produced a Portishead album. We experimented with engineering techniques from Phil Spector and Al Green’s Back Up Train, drum programming from RZA and Outkast, and were listening to a lot of The Impressions, John Lennon, Wu-Tang, Madlib, and Screaming Jay Hawkins.”
“Bet She Looks Like You,” recorded mostly in his home bedroom, was one of the first songs that “started this fire for exploring this experiment through song.” Each track peels back a particular aspect of his life: on the title song, he gets deeply personal, reflecting on a recurring dream. “All these things reflect how I feel, how I write,” he says. “I sometimes have trouble articulating myself verbally. This is a place I can talk and be myself, with music, this intangible space I create.”
Hakim’s debut comes as the culmination of years chiseling his skills as a musician. Hailing from Washington, D.C., he grew up in a musical household—his older brother introduced him to bands like Bad Brains and Nirvana, and his parents exposed him to Nueva canción—while he set out on his own to discover the DC music scene. He didn’t take an interest in learning an instrument until later in high school, when he taught himself to play the keys. After graduation, he moved to Boston to continue his study of music. In the time since moving to Brooklyn and setting to work for three years on Green Twins, he embraced the live circuit, both as a solo musician and with his band, whom he’s brought together from within his community in Boston and New York.
With Green Twins, Hakim plans to tour through the beginning of the year, and hopes that folks will connect with the songs he’d written. “I think everybody feels insecure about certain things and everybody has lost people dear to them. I think I’m writing about common things that people feel,” he says. “I’m very grateful for anybody that’s listening or wants to be a part of my little world that I’ve created through song.”

 

Gabriel Garzón-Montano


8:45 pm

On his debut LP, Jardín, Gabriel Garzón-Montano sings of the struggles and uncertainties of the many-layered game that is America today, from the specific doubt and double consciousness of the first-generation hustle, to the universal challenges of love, legacy, and exploring the maze of one's own mind. A child of immigrant parents - a child of Brooklyn, NY - Garzón-Montano’s aesthetic is an extension of his French-Colombian heritage, a pastiche of Bach sonatas, cumbia records, and the machine gun funk that echoes to this day from behind half-rolled tints up and down Nostrand Ave. His mother, a member of the Philip Glass ensemble in the 1990’s, instilled within him a painstaking attention to detail that remains a hallmark of his process. “My mother is the reason I love music,” he says. Her rigorous classical instruction served as his creative engine as he honed his skills over the course of years in the lab, copping Stevie's changes, studying Prince's lyrics, and absorbing the beat theses of Timbaland, Dilla, and Pete Rock.

Jardín comes on the heels of three intense years of touring, writing and recording. Soon after the 2014 release of his debut EP, Bishouné: Alma del Huila, Gabriel was invited out on the road by rock legend Lenny Kravitz, as direct support on 23 concerts across Europe. The day after playing Wembley Arena, he received a call notifying him that his song "6 8" would be sampled by Drake on his full-length If You're Reading This, It's Too Late. The months following these cosigns Garzón-Montano was featured at Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, and Austin City Limits, and on back-to-back tours with English indie-rockers Glass Animals and Stones Throw label mate Mayer Hawthorne.

In 2016, he returned to Waterfront Studios in Hudson, NY, to record Jardín with his mentor, analog guru Henry Hirsch. A capable multi-instrumentalist, Gabriel tracked drums, bass, guitar, piano, and synthesizers direct to 2" tape, adding percussion, digital programming, and several layers of his own vocals to create a lush sonic environment that recalls a contemporary, streetwise Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. "I wanted to make music that would remind people how beautiful life is - how delicate their hearts are," says Garzón-Montano. "A garden is full of life, and growth, and beauty. I named the album Jardín hoping for it to create a space for healing when people put it on. I've always wanted to make music that is healing, comforting, and funky." This intention is, perhaps, what has always attracted listeners to his music. Fans of Bishouné will find familiar ground in the organic sounds and impressionist narratives of Jardín: the Moog-heavy "Fruitflies" reads as a lyrical epilogue to "Keep on Running," while "The Game" brings the folkloric percussion of "Me Alone" home from Cartagena to Crown Heights. The enduring choruses of "Sour Mango," "Crawl," and "My Balloon" exhibit a melodic and compositional craftsmanship reminiscent of the fan favorite "Everything is Everything," confirming Garzón-Montano's innate pop sensibilities, and his indisputable knack for fusing a wide range of classic influences and cutting-edge ideas to create a sound all his own.

 

Wild Belle


10 pm

Natalie Bergman has had her picture taken on countless occasions hundreds of studio portraits and live shots and backstage festival snaps. But the simple, gorgeous black & white photo of Bergman on the cover of Wild Belle’s Dreamland that she describes as “just me and this sort of abyss”? That one was lensed by the person who best knows how to capture her essence on celluloid: Her older brother and bandmate, Elliot Bergman. Besides being Wild Belle’s multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire, Elliot has an equally impressive flair for visual arts, from painting and sculpture to bronze-making and photography. An avid collector of vintage cameras, Elliot brought along a recently acquired Polaroid Land Camera to a show Wild Belle played in Denver this summer: The duo grabbed a quick moment at their hotel to take the portraits of each other that grace the front and back of their new record. “The pictures Elliot takes of me are always really beautiful and it’s because he knows me better than anyone else on this Earth,” says Natalie. Adds Elliot: “I like that it’s a photo of Natalie just being Natalie. And the stark contrast of her in the foreground with the dark background really fit with these collages she has been doing. Natalie is in the light but the shadows are pretty heavy and you can’t really tell where she is or what’s back there.” Recorded at studios in their native Chicago, Natalie’s new home of Los Angeles, Nashville and Toronto, Dreamland -- Wild Belle’s bold, evolutionary new album -- derives from an era in the singer’s life when she was struggling to get control of what she describes as the “anger and deep sorrow” that plagued her at the end of her most recent romantic relationship. For a woman whose music has always been inspired by her desire to translate her complicated feelings into immediately relatable songs, there was certainly plenty of grist for the mill. Dreamland tracks such as “Losing You” and “It Was You (Baby Come Back)” offer glimpses of the darkness that Natalie battled during the early months writing for the duo’s sophomore full-length. But there are also genuine moments of lightness and ecstatic triumph, like “Giving Up On You” an irresistibly kinetic, punk number Wild Belle recorded with TV On The Radio’s Dave Sitek producing. “I was very heated when we were making this record. My body, my heart and my soul were filled with a flame, which sounds very dramatic but it’s the truth,” says Natalie. “I had ahealing moment when I moved to LA earlier this year, because I was far away from my ex and I felt like I was getting rid of a lot of baggage. That was the redemptive, triumphant time for my lyrics. On ‘Giving Up On You,’ I sing: ‘Now I smile so bright, you can see me from outer space, look at me shine. Baby it’s about time, I was so miserable and now I feel so alive.’ All the songs I wrote near the end of making the album have that sentiment: ‘Now look at where I am, after all the turmoil that was inside of me, I’m here and I’m happy and I’m ready for whatever comes my way.’” The follow-up to 2013’s Isles, Dreamland expands the band’s ambitions in every way. ”It’s deeper, it’s more fun, it’s more haunting, it’s got more grooves,” Elliot says. “There’s sorrow and pain but there’s also hope and joy -all those things can coexist in the songs because they coexist in life.” He continues: “Dreamland, that’s not some kind of idealized notion of where we live and I hope people hear that as a question: “What is the Dreamland? What is our dream here?”
The album doesn’t get overtly political, but we’re dealing with a lot of the things that are dark about what’s happening now. ‘Throw Down Your Guns’ is about a relationship but is also kind of about the messed up situation that we’re in right now. The chorus, ‘Throw down your guns / In the name of love, I put my hands up,’ to me can be heard in a number of ways, including as a prayer for peace or a cry out against violence.” Importantly, the album also shares its name with one of the first songs Natalie remembers Elliot introducing her to: Bunny Wailer’s 1970 reggae classic, “Dreamland.” One year for Christmas, he gave her a compilation of female artists who recorded at Jamaica’s legendary Studio One, and it included Della Humphrey’s version of the song. Natalie listened to it over and over and over again. “I was so in love with it,” she says. “From there, I started my exploration of rocksteady and ska and lovers rock and anything that had to do with Jamaican music from the Fifties onward.” The duo started writing music together several years ago, after Elliot took a sixteen year-old Natalie on tour to play percussion with his acclaimed Afrobeat ensemble, NOMO. “I can present a song to Elliot and he has this foresight- he can see things further than I see them, and he helps me realize things,” she says. “I’d been writing very simple melodic love songs since I was fifteen years old. I definitely have a pop sensibility in my style, and that’s a great platform for Elliot to work from, because it’s fun for him to have a cool little pop song and combine it with more eccentric sounds and make it into a weird, unique percussive jam. Sometimes he’ll bring the jam to me and because we’ve got this routine together, we can write a song together wherever we are.”

Work on the album began in early 2014, in Chicago. The song that opens Dreamland- “Mississippi River” was also the first one to come together in the studio. It was sparked by a moment of musical serendipity: “The record starts with this pulsing ARP drone,” says Elliot, “which is a very expensive esoteric nerdy synthesizer that’s complicated to program. Natalie and I had this weird, symbiotic thing where I was playing three chords off the ARP and she started playing different three chords on this out-of-tune autoharp she brought over. They were both completely in the wrong key, and yet perfectly in tune with each other. That was like the new bar for the record. It was like, ‘Yeah, we’re going to put synthesizers and saxophone and kalimbas on these songs, and we’re going to have lavish string arrangements if we want to. We were getting comfortable with all of the materials that we love, and being like, ‘I love this, so let’s do it.” They tracked several songs at home in Chicago last year, and then at the start of 2015, Natalie packed all of her belongings into the Wild Belle van and drove from Chicago to Venice, California. She rented a house where Elliot joined her a couple weeks later. “When I had my place in Venice, Elliot would wake up earlier than I would and start making dope beats,” says Natalie. “One day he made this ridiculous song, ‘The One That Got Away,’ and the beat and underlying track were so exciting that it didn’t take very long to write. Our friends came over and were jumping on the tabletops, dancing, getting naked because they loved the song so much.” “Playing the new songs at Lollapalooza for the first time with an eight-piece band,” says Elliot, “I had a feeling onstage that I’d never had before with Wild Belle, where you’re part of a sound that’s much bigger than you could make on your own. It’s this charged-up badass feeling. It’s about a groove and rhythmic energy and force and momentum and making a big, dark, deep sound -- something that moves people and makes you want to dance and makes you want to shout. It’s tapping into a deeper musicality that I’ve always been looking for.

 

DJ Sets with Anne Litt


6 pm, 8:15 pm, 9:30 pm

Anne Litt has been anchoring weekend afternoons for NPR’s LA flagship, 89.9 KCRW since 1996, playing a seductive mix of sounds from around the world. Her goal is to take listeners on a sonic journey, telling stories of the past, present and future. She contributes regularly to NPR Music's Heavy Rotation series and is a frequent guest on the NPR syndicated radio show “Here And Now.”   Outside of public radio, Anne’s projects include her ongoing music series, "Music In The Garden", voiceover work, and music consultation/supervision for TV, film, advertising and brands.  She knows of no activity more satisfying, in this world, than hosting her radio show -- unless it's skiing with her young son, Guy.


Hear all of the First Fridays discussions on iTunes or  SoundCloud