Lectures | Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

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Lectures

 



THURSDAYS | October 4 & 18, November 1
at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum

 

All plants and animals, including humans, move during their lifetimes, but some take truly harrowing or magnificent journeys to new lands and habitats. This Fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum will join the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability to produce a three-night conversation between the people of Los Angeles and the leading experts on migration. Looking across species and time, we strip away politics and nation-state boundaries to discover the causes and outcomes of migration for all life forms.
 

Paid Parking is available at the Museum's Car Park located off of Curson.

SCHEDULE:

6:00 pm – Doors open
7:00 pm – Conversation
8:30 pm – Program concludes
 

COST: FREE, Reservation Required

Reservation Policy for Free Programs:
Seating is on a first-come first-served basis. For Museum programs that are free of charge, it is our policy to overbook. In the case of a FULL program your free reservation may not guarantee admission. We recommend arriving early because seating is limited. Space permitting, unclaimed reservations will be released to standby patrons at approximately 6:30 pm.

 

 

October 4 | It’s Time to Leave, The Causes of Migration

For many species, migration is a question of when, not if. Sometimes it is the result of fresh opportunities in unfamiliar terrain. Other times it is driven by external forces, natural and unnatural. From floods and fires to developing societies — tonight we will get to the root causes of migration.

 

 

Emily Lindsey

​​​​​​Dr. Emily Lindsey is Assistant Curator and Excavation Site Director at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum. Her research focuses on using information from the last 50,000 years of ecological upheaval to understand how climate change and human actions combine to cause extinctions, and to predict how plants and animals will respond in the face of modern global change. Dr. Lindsey has conducted fieldwork in the United States, Antarctica, Chile, Guyana, and Ecuador, where she studies the geology and paleontology of tropical asphaltic fossil sites.

Dr. Lindsey is Adjunct Faculty in the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA and the Department of Earth Sciences at USC, and serves on the board of the Institute for Field Research. She studied at Brown University, the University of California – Berkeley, and as a Fulbright scholar at the Museo Nacional de Historia Natural in Uruguay, before joining NHMLA in 2016.

 

 

Roger Waldinger

Roger Waldinger, Distinguished Professor (Ph.D. Harvard, 1983) and Director of the UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration works on international migration: its social, political, and economic consequences; the policies and politics emerging in response to its advent; the links between immigrants and the countries and people they have left behind; the trajectories of newcomers and their descendants after migration. He is the author of over 100 articles and book chapters and nine books, most recently, Origins the Destinations: The Making of the Second Generation (Russell Sage Foundation, 2018):  A Century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and their Homeland Connections (edited with Nancy Green; University of Illinois Press, 2016) and The Cross-Border Connection: Immigrants, Emigrants, and their Homelands, (Harvard University Press, 2015).

 

 

Cara Santa Maria (moderator)

Cara Santa Maria is a Los Angeles Area Emmy and Knight Foundation Award winning journalist, science communicator, television personality, producer, and podcaster.

Cara is a correspondent on National Geographic's Explorer and Netflix's Bill Nye Saves the World. She is the creator and host of a weekly science podcast called Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria and cohosts the popular Skeptics' Guide to the Universe podcast. She is a founding member of the Nerd Brigade and cofounded the annual science communication retreat #SciCommCamp.

Cara earned her B.S. in Psychology from the University of North Texas in 2004, followed by an M.S. in Neurobiology in 2007. She is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a concentration in Social Justice and Diversity from Fielding Graduate University.

 

October 18 | A New Home, The Effects of Migration

What happened after humans crossed from Asia and arrived in North America? Do non-native species like Eucalyptus trees, wild boars, and Argentine ants blend in or wreak havoc? Plants, animals, and people have always traveled the globe; the intermingling of minds and molecules has changed landscapes and culture throughout history, and it changes our world today. Tonight we’ll take a closer look at what happens when new species show up on the scene.

 

 

Amy Gusick

Dr. Amy E. Gusick is the Associate Curator for Archaeology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.  She earned a Master's degree in 2007 and Ph.D. in 2012 from the Archaeology program of UC Santa Barbara. Prior to her current positon, she was an Assistant Professor and the Director of the Graduate Program in Applied Archaeology at California State University, San Bernardino and was an archaeologist with the Channel Islands National Park. Dr. Gusick is an environmental archaeologist who focuses on island and coastal archaeology, human-environmental dynamics, the development of maritime societies, peopling of the Americas, and hunter-gatherer subsistence and settlement. Her current research projects on early human coastal migration and settlement and the effect of environmental stress on Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene human groups is focused on the Northern Pacific Rim, particularly on the Channel Islands off California.

 

 

Peter Kareiva

Peter Kareiva is the director of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA, as well as the Pritzker Distinguished Professor in Environment & Sustainability. Before coming to UCLA, Kareiva was the Chief Scientist and Vice President of The Nature Conservancy, where he was responsible for maintaining the quality of over 600 staff engaged in conservation science in 36 countries around the world.

Kareiva studied political science and zoology at Duke University for his bachelor’s degree and ecology and applied mathematics at Cornell University for his Ph.D. He is the author of more than 150 scientific publications and author or editor of eight books, including a textbook on conservation science.  His most recent book (2017), Effective Conservation Science: Data not Dogma challenges conservationists to question received wisdom, and look to their data for surprises and new ideas that could be key to sustaining biodiversity.

 

 

Ruxandra Guidi (moderator)

Ruxandra Guidi is a native of Caracas, Venezuela, is an independent storyteller with almost two decades of experience in public radio, magazines, and multimedia. She has reported news throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region. She’s worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR’s Latino USA, the BBC daily news program, The World, the CPB-funded Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio’s immigration beat in Los Angeles. For more than ten years, she has been collaborating regularly with her husband, photographer Bear Guerra, under the name Fonografia Collective. Currently, the pair is developing a storytelling project about the site of a future park in Los Angeles, in collaboration with Clockshop, a local arts organization, and California State Parks.

 

November 1 | Los Angeles, A Migration Haven

The city of Los Angeles was established with incredible diversity, and this biological hotspot is considered a haven to humans and wildlife from around the world. Both new wildlife and people can accompany ecological and economy impacts within a place. So, how have our vibrant populations in Los Angeles directly contributed to making this a hub for innovation, art and community success? Join us as we look deeper into the causes and outcomes of plant, animal, and human migration in L.A.

 

 

Greg Pauly

Dr. Greg Pauly is Co-director of the Urban Nature Research Center and Curator of Herpetology at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. He studies the natural history, evolution, and conservation of reptiles and amphibians. Since joining the Museum in 2012, he has increasingly studied the impacts of urbanization on wildlife. Pauly developed the Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California (RASCals) community science project as a way to compare modern species distribution records with historical museum records to understand how species ranges have shifted with increasing urbanization. Pauly was also one of the lead curators on the Museum's award-winning Nature Lab exhibit. He has published over 35 scholarly papers in various journals including Evolution, Conservation Biology, Biological Conservation, PLoS One, and Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Pauly also co-authored Wild L.A.: Explore the Amazing Nature in and around Los Angeles, which will be available March 2019.

 

 

Marcelo Suárez-Orozco

Marcelo Suárez-Orozco, the inaugural UCLA Wasserman Dean, leads two academic departments, 16 nationally renowned research institutes, and two innovative demonstration schools at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education & Information Studies. His research focuses on cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, with an emphasis on migration, globalization, and education.  His award-winning books have been published by Harvard University Press, Stanford University Press, University of California Press, Cambridge University Press, New York University Press, and others. His scholarly papers, in a range of disciplines and languages, appear in journals including Harvard Business Review, Harvard Educational Review, Revue Française de Pédagogie (Paris), Cultuur en Migratie (Leuven), Temas: Cultura, Ideologia y Sociedad (Havana), Ethos, The Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Harvard Policy Review, and others. He regularly contributes to national and international media outlets including The New York Times, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, Time, Newsweek, U.S News and World Report, The Huffington Post, CNN, NPR, CNN Español, and MSNBC.

 

 

Ruxandra Guidi (moderator)

Ruxandra Guidi is a native of Caracas, Venezuela, is an independent storyteller with almost two decades of experience in public radio, magazines, and multimedia. She has reported news throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region. She’s worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR’s Latino USA, the BBC daily news program, The World, the CPB-funded Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio’s immigration beat in Los Angeles. For more than ten years, she has been collaborating regularly with her husband, photographer Bear Guerra, under the name Fonografia Collective. Currently, the pair is developing a storytelling project about the site of a future park in Los Angeles, in collaboration with Clockshop, a local arts organization, and California State Parks.