Our museums remain closed due to COVID-19. While LA County Public Health has entered Phase 3 of the Roadmap to Recovery, allowing for the reopening of museums on June 12, our museums are still slowly welcoming back staff and are in the process of planning for new health and safety protocols in our galleries and gardens. Therefore, we will not be reopening until later in the summer. Sign up here to be the first to know when we will safely re-open to the public and in the meantime, stay connected from home.

Wildlife Viewing

Take a break and watch some of the animals that visit our Nature Gardens.

A group of birds make use of the feeds at the Museum's bird watching platform

From butterflies to birds, every bush, flower, and tree in the Nature Gardens was planted with animals in mind. We’ve created some special places where you are sure to find them!

A sign reading "bee hotel" in front of wood poles with holes drilled for bees

Bee hotels for native bees.

A leaf-cutter bee crawls out of a hole in some wood

Leaf-cutter bee emerging from bee hotel.

People stand at the Museum's bird watching platform

A group gathers at the bird-viewing platform.

Hummingbird feeders installed in the Nature Gardens

Hummingbird feeders.

Hummingbird at rest on a branch

Allen's hummingbird at rest.

Chalkboard sign listing bird species at bird watching platform

A chalkboard sign with tips for creating habitat for birds.

Close up of finches on a bird feeder

House finches take a feeding break.

1 of 1

Bee hotels for native bees.

Leaf-cutter bee emerging from bee hotel.

A group gathers at the bird-viewing platform.

Hummingbird feeders.

Allen's hummingbird at rest.

A chalkboard sign with tips for creating habitat for birds.

House finches take a feeding break.

PLACES TO watch for wildlife:
 

  • The bird-viewing platform provides a place to see many species of local birds.
  • Nectar-rich flowers surrounding our hummingbird feeders are a favorite gathering place for hummingbirds.
  • Wooden bee boxes near the Pollinator Meadow provide habitat for California natives like the leaf-cutter bee.