In accordance with the L.A. City Municipal Code Ordinance mandate, beginning November 4, all eligible patrons are required to show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test performed within 72 hours. Visitors 18+ must also show a valid photo ID. View our COVID-19 Safety Guidelines for more information.  On October 23 the museum will be closing early at 2 pm.

Our 10 Year Dinoversary

Celebrating the first decade of NHM's ground-shaking Dinosaur Hall

Masked growth series

Since NHM opened the Jane G. Pisano Dinosaur Hall in the summer of 2011, millions of visitors have marveled at the massive, mighty giants of ancient Earth. The award-winning exhibition, rivaling the world’s leading monumental installations of Cretaceous wonders, displays some of the most commanding and beguiling dinosaurs and sea creatures to ever inhabit our prehistoric planet. The two-story hall’s 20 complete skeletons include the enormous Triceratops, a long-necked Mamenchisaurus (which stretches longer than a city bus), and a flock of chicken-sized Fruitadens haagarorum. The spectacular T. rex growth series—an installation that exists only at NHM—shows a baby, juvenile, and young adult T. rex specimens hovering over the remains of their prey.

Photograph of dinosaurs on display at NHM

The T. rex growth series in the Dinosaur Hall

Juvenile Trex white bg

The juvenile T. rex: an adorable part of the one-of-a-kind T. rex growth series in NHM's Dinosaur Hall

T. rex adolescent front half

Is it us, or is this adolescent T. rex sulking?

Adolescent T. rex back half

They grow up so fast. And long.

T. rex Adult White BG

The all grown up T. rex rounds out the growth series in all its adult apex predator glory. 

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The T. rex growth series in the Dinosaur Hall

The juvenile T. rex: an adorable part of the one-of-a-kind T. rex growth series in NHM's Dinosaur Hall

Is it us, or is this adolescent T. rex sulking?

They grow up so fast. And long.

The all grown up T. rex rounds out the growth series in all its adult apex predator glory. 

The airy hall, filled with over 300 fossil specimens, is designed to allow visitors to chart their own path, just like real paleontologists who investigate life that existed during the Age of Dinosaurs. Behind-the-scenes film footage of paleontological expeditions help visitors follow their curiosity to answer age-old questions: What is a dinosaur? How did they live? What happened to them? Where do you find fossils? How did you get these massive bones inside the building?! Perhaps the most mind-blowing fact is that (literally) tons of these dino bones were excavated by NHM's Dinosaur Institute crew!

Triceratops skeleton
The bones of the majestic Triceratops that greets visitors to the Hall were excavated by the Dinosaur Institute crew in Wyoming and Montana from 2001-2007.
Stegosaurus skeleton
Ever wonder what a Stegosaurus’ spike felt like? You'll get your answer in the Dinosaur Hall.
pregnant plesiosaur in dinosaur hall
This spectacular 15.5-foot wide and 8-foot-tall specimen is the only pregnant plesiosaur fossil ever discovered.

Our Dinosaur Institute Director explains why this marine reptile blows his mind!

 

Besides these mounted skeletons, there are videos and touchscreens that show what they might have looked like as fleshed-out creatures. Visitors can also look at microscopic evidence up close, manipulate tumblers to piece together fragments of bone, or crouch beneath a platform to feel fossils embedded in simulated rock. The Dinosaur Hall exhibition is an invitation to play the part of prospector, geologist, paleontologist, and excavator all in one outing. Follow the cast of a dinosaur trackway installed in the floor, compare your feet to a dinosaur imprint, and share with us what you discover.

Children looking into a floor cutout showing dinosaur fossils embedded in rock

Kids walk in the footprints of California's biggest dinosaur.

Looking down from the balcony into the expansive Dinosaur Hall

Look down on the T. rex trio from the balcony of the Dinosaur Hall.

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Kids walk in the footprints of California's biggest dinosaur.

Look down on the T. rex trio from the balcony of the Dinosaur Hall.

Look at how we got our trio of T. rexes to stand tall!