Dinosaur Hall

Explore the Age of Dinosaurs (and see how scientists discover them) in our award-winning exhibition!

Photo of Dinosaur Hall

General Info

Free with paid museum admission
Free for Members

Across the two floors of the Jane G. Pisano Dinosaur Hall, you’ll roam under, around, and above 20 mounted skeletons of the largest and most interesting dinosaurs and sea creatures to ever inhabit prehistoric Earth. Examine over 300 fossils, just like real paleontologists, to study dinosaurs and their ancient world.

Three children looking at dinosaur skull

Learn how big dinosaurs could get.

Looking down from the balcony into the expansive Dinosaur Hall

Look down on the T. rex trio from the balcony of the Dinosaur Hall.

Woman and child looking down from balcony at dinosaur bones

View from the balcony into the Dinosaur Hall.

Children looking into a floor cutout showing dinosaur fossils embedded in rock

Kids walk in the footprints of California's biggest dinosaur.

A museum volunteer talking to a group of children in the Dinosaur Hall

Take a guided tour of the Dinosaur Hall.

gallery interpreter at curiosity cart talking to a child in Dinosaur Hall
A young woman looking closely at the sharp teeth of a dinosaur

Get an intimate look at these extraordinary creatures.

Two women talking surrounded by numerous species of fossilized dinosaurs

There's a lot to see in this 14,000-square-foot exhibition.

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Learn how big dinosaurs could get.

Look down on the T. rex trio from the balcony of the Dinosaur Hall.

View from the balcony into the Dinosaur Hall.

Kids walk in the footprints of California's biggest dinosaur.

Take a guided tour of the Dinosaur Hall.

Get an intimate look at these extraordinary creatures.

There's a lot to see in this 14,000-square-foot exhibition.

ALONG THE WAY, YOU'LL:

  • Feel a real Triceratops fossil that is over 65 million years old.
  • Check out the only place in the world where you can see a baby, juvenile, and sub-adult T. rex at the same time.
  • Discover how paleontologists use fossils to unravel the mysteries of dinosaurs.