On Saturday, August 17, Exposition Park will host the USC Football Fall Showcase from 1:30 pm to 6:30pm. This event may impact traffic, parking, and wayfinding in the area. Please consider riding the Metro Expo Line and exiting at USC/Expo station.

Our Collections

We maintain a large and world-renowned archive of the world’s nature and cultures.

We support our own and the rest of the world’s scholars by building and preserving an archive of objects, artifacts, and specimens from the natural world and human cultures, across the whole globe and from the present to billions of years ago. Our collections support current research and await future research uses no one has even thought of yet.

Sometimes we also use these objects, artifacts, and specimens in support of exhibitions and public programming, and visitors can see some of them on display, but those are not the primary purpose for the research collection. At the end of the day, it is an ever-growing record of nature and culture for anyone to use to better understand our world.

Coelacanth Fish
Coelacanth Fish
Did you know? Coelacanth fish “walk” on their fins like land animals use their legs.

Recent Acquisitions

Spiny trilobite fossil

This amazing fossil was generously donated by a NHM volunteer!

This spiny trilobite (Kettneraspis) from Morocco is remarkable in its many adaptations to life on a muddy seafloor 400 million years ago. Short spines on the head shield enabled the trilobite to anchor itself into mud while it scavenged for food, spines on the tail segment acted as a rake to trap live prey kicked up by its digging legs, while the long projecting spines along its sides, perhaps offered protection against predators swimming above. Even its eyes are elevated on little stalks to offer better visibility above the seafloor.

"October belongs to Coyote"  Navajo Basket

This basket is made of sumac that was gathered along desert streams in the Douglas Mesa of Utah by Navajo weaver, Betty Betsinnie Rock. According to the vendor (Twin Rocks Trading Post in Utah), “through elements of design, Betty’s basket represents the month of October. Because October belongs to Coyote, it is always a bit chaotic. Weather patterns are in flux, people are modifying their behavior in anticipation of winter, and the environment is adapting to cooler weather. Change is the keyword here. Betty’s basket expresses the mood with Coyote tracks all around and giant whirligig in the center. The red and white color scheme represents the change in light and character of the new season.”

Callistocypraea broderipii

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Callistocypraea broderipii (Gray, 1832), from off Natal, South Africa (LACM 181358). This species was once one of the great rarities of the shell world until it's deep water habitat was discovered in the 1970's. Since then more specimens have been collected but it is still considered a rare species. This is the first specimen of this species in the Malacology collection.

Perisserosa guttata surinensis

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Perisserosa guttata surinensis (Raybaudi, 1978, from Pulau Raja, Indonesia (LACM 181360). This beautiful subspecies is much more rare than the nominal species P. guttata (Gmelin, 1791). It also is the first specimen of this subspecies in the Malacology collection.

Worldwide volute shells

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Worldwide volute shells donated by Robert Sinclair

Worldwide cone shells

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Worldwide cone shells donated by Robert Sinclair

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This spiny trilobite (Kettneraspis) from Morocco is remarkable in its many adaptations to life on a muddy seafloor 400 million years ago. Short spines on the head shield enabled the trilobite to anchor itself into mud while it scavenged for food, spines on the tail segment acted as a rake to trap live prey kicked up by its digging legs, while the long projecting spines along its sides, perhaps offered protection against predators swimming above. Even its eyes are elevated on little stalks to offer better visibility above the seafloor.

This amazing fossil was generously donated by a NHM volunteer!

This basket is made of sumac that was gathered along desert streams in the Douglas Mesa of Utah by Navajo weaver, Betty Betsinnie Rock. According to the vendor (Twin Rocks Trading Post in Utah), “through elements of design, Betty’s basket represents the month of October. Because October belongs to Coyote, it is always a bit chaotic. Weather patterns are in flux, people are modifying their behavior in anticipation of winter, and the environment is adapting to cooler weather. Change is the keyword here. Betty’s basket expresses the mood with Coyote tracks all around and giant whirligig in the center. The red and white color scheme represents the change in light and character of the new season.”

Callistocypraea broderipii (Gray, 1832), from off Natal, South Africa (LACM 181358). This species was once one of the great rarities of the shell world until it's deep water habitat was discovered in the 1970's. Since then more specimens have been collected but it is still considered a rare species. This is the first specimen of this species in the Malacology collection.

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Perisserosa guttata surinensis (Raybaudi, 1978, from Pulau Raja, Indonesia (LACM 181360). This beautiful subspecies is much more rare than the nominal species P. guttata (Gmelin, 1791). It also is the first specimen of this subspecies in the Malacology collection.

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Worldwide volute shells donated by Robert Sinclair

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology

Worldwide cone shells donated by Robert Sinclair

Lindsey T. Groves, Malacology